Author Topic: Different Between Djembe and Doumbek.  (Read 1412 times)

mitshuki

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Different Between Djembe and Doumbek.
« on: October 13, 2015, 04:59:12 AM »
First off, Doumbek is much more higher pitched than a Djembe(at least should be) and the rhythms you follow are in 3s and 2s. Typically it accompanies a Tar or Riq and you play certain rhythms back and forth. A Doumbek is played in your lap with your left hand hitting with your fourth finger and it coming "down" into the rim of the head. Your right hand goes into it with the meat of your fingers for a doum and the tips of your fingers on the rim for a Tek. The doumbek has MANY different capable sounds (snaps, scraps, flicks, you name it). A Doumbek is very much a solo instrument.

Where as, a Djembe is more of a "let's jam" instrument. Everyone plays relatively the same pitch and rhythm while one person solos, but never really changing it up. A Djembes technique is rather simple, and has less sounds to produce. But the rhythm and quality that is produced by the natives of Africa is incredible, clearly feeling no limit. I'd say it is more spiritual to play, and accompanies many more things then what Doumbek can.

That being said, they both have their uses. You should learn how to play both. As a percussionist I'd hate to limit myself. We have a world of instruments to play, and the possibilities are endless.

If you have any question then ask me here.



Kalasinar

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Re: Different Between Djembe and Doumbek.
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2015, 10:23:21 AM »
Djembe has been on my to-get list for a while but to get a good size drum seems to be rather expensive in the UK. Are there any particular djembes you can recommend? Are rope tuned djembes better than bolt tuned djembes? I have had chances to play around on djembes in shops, but none have particularly wowed me. I prefer the darbuka much more because of the vast range of sounds and expression it can produce. And i totally agree, the darbuka can be both a solo/lead instrument and accompaniment in skilled hands, while the djembe just seems more background accompaniment to me. I've had enough 'background accompaniment' playing in my long years of playing kit drums, so when i was introduced to the darbuka i was immediately hooked because of the various possibilities it opened up. It reignited my passion for percussion!

I agree it is important for drummers to play different kinds of drums, if not just for experimentation, but to learn all the different techniques which can only enhance our skills. When i was taught kit drums my teacher also encouraged me to play the bongos as well, and often we would jam together for fun (and my educational benefit) - one of us on kit, the other on bongos.

Since picking up the darbuka i have also picked up the cajon. I got a riq as well but have yet to start learning it due to my focus on darbuka. I'd like to get a djembe and a bodhrán eventually when i have money to spare on them, but for now i am happy with my small arsenal of kit drums, bongos, darbuka and cajon (and riq) ^^
« Last Edit: October 14, 2015, 11:20:32 AM by Kalasinar »

Laurence

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Re: Different Between Djembe and Doumbek.
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2015, 04:43:27 PM »
I guess there are advantages to not being formally trained. Nobody explained to me I can't do finger rolls on my djembe. So I do. Especially accompanying Irish pub music, I use non-traditional methods on my doumbek also to good effect in other music. When doumbeks and djembes are playing together the djembes tend to hold the main rhythm down while the doumbeks cut through with those gorgeous high notes. I've seen wonderful dialogues take place between the two.